Posts Tagged 2013

2013 Resolutions

I’ve talked my 2012 resolution to death. It was overly ambitious, especially in light of a new member of the household, but it’s one I’m still glad I set. I’d rather overreach with a resolution and let that push me through the year than underreach and be left with no motivation as the year ends. With that said, here we go with some overreaching resolutions for 2013.

Writing Resolution #1: Query Nickajack. Yup, like a zombie rising up from the grave, this goal is back for 2013, and feels much more attainable. We’ve still got some editing to do, some alpha reading to endure, some more editing to do, some beta reading to endure, and yes, even more editing to do. But I think we can pound that all out this year if we keep our eye on the prize. The fact that the alpha and beta reading stages will leave us with downtime leads to writing resolution #2…

Writing Resolution #2: Draft Mogollon. We’ve talked the plot of Mogollon at the highest levels, potentially know all our POV characters (if you’re my wife and reading this, I still love the character we created at dinner Saturday night), and should be ready to sit down and outline this beast once Nickajack is with the alpha readers. Drafting ends up a fitting term for this process, in racing you draft to move faster, and I unquestionably move the fastest when I’m sitting at a keyboard and generating fresh words. Which leads to, yes, a third writing resolution…

Writing Resolution #3: Draft Sarah Constant. I still don’t even have a good working title for this story yet, which is fine, because I don’t plan to write it until late in the year. Over the last few years, after deciding that pantsing it through Nanowrimo isn’t for me, I’ve still been interested to try the event with a fully realized outline to work from. So for the first ten months this year I’ll be outlining this novel in my spare time with the goal of sitting down and writing at least the first 50,000 words of it in November, if not the whole bloody thing. This might be where I’m officially overreaching.

Reading Resolution: 30 Novels. This I’m intentionally setting my sights low. But it will still be more than I’ve read in most recent years. 12 of these will be the primary novels for the Great Hugo Read, 6 or so will probably be secondary novels, the remaining 12 will be random other picks. And, hopefully, there will be more than those.

So there you have it, laid out in the most open forum available to me. I’m going to skip State of the Writer in January, as it would just be a repetition of this post, but those goals will kick off SotW starting in February and each month after that.

Have a happy new year. Ring it in safely.

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The Great Hugo Read

One unexpected side effect of fatherhood is an increase in my available reading time. I’m not sure where it all came from, but I’m loving it. Since starting my two weeks at home with my daughter, and continuing through going back to work, I’m now reading novels at a pace of better than one a week. It’s mostly been John Scalzi, as I finally started reading his novels coincident with staying home and got hooked. After reading mostly Ace Doubles for a while, it was great to dip my toes back into contemporary science fiction. I’m not done with Doubles, just interspersing.

As part of this expanded reading time, I’m launching on two connected reading projects. They will not represent the total of my reading time, but they will get weaved in among the other novels and stories I’m going through, and both will involve the Hugo Awards. Thus I’m calling them both, together, the Great Hugo Read.

Part one: I’m going to read all the novels nominated for the 2013 Hugo Award. I’ve only read one Hugo winner before it won the Hugo, and that was Neil Gaiman’s The Graveyard Book. With my reading patterns the past few years, this goal would be ambitious to say the least. Nominations come out in April, the awards will be presented on September 1. That’s five months, but a month a novel was a typical reading pace for me until recently. Now it doesn’t seem nearly so crazy. It’ll be fun going into the ceremony with an educated opinion. It’s crazy, I know.

I hope to get a head start by reading Redshirts in January. Hopefully I’m not jinxing things by anticipating this as part of my 2013 nominee read.

Part two: This is the bigger part, and it’s not just a 2013 goal. When I said above I’ve only read one Hugo winner before it won…well, that doesn’t seem quite so crazy when you factor in that I’ve only read four Hugo winners. Ever. That’s it. Here’s the whole and complete list:

  • Rendezvous with Rama
  • The Diamond Age
  • American Gods
  • The Graveyard Book

That’s it. Four. And it’s only that high because both the Hugos and I are fans of Neil Gaiman. I’m looking to fix that, and I’m looking to do so in the most extreme way possible. I’m going to start reading all the Hugo winners. That’s 62 novels, way more than I could read in one year even if I skipped the ones I’ve already read and read nothing but Hugo winners. This isn’t my plan, they’ll be interspersed with my other reading, perhaps every other or every third book. I like this as a project, getting more of a history of the genre that I love. However, there are some pitfalls.

Series. Oh sure, there are the series that make it easy. Connie Willis has been gracious enough to win for every book in the Oxford Time Travel series, so while they’ll be spread out, I don’t have to make any decisions about what pre-reading I need to do. The Harry Potter series winning for Goblet of Fire is alright, I’ve seen the movies, I think I can get enough of what happened in the first three books to jump right into the fourth. Hell, I’m sure I’ll end up reading the whole series with my daughter eventually anyway. Green Mars and Blue Mars winning when Red Mars didn’t? I’ve been wanting to read the trilogy for a long time anyway, and Red Mars will give me a head start if I want to later read the Nebula winners.

However, things get more difficult when I get into Lois McMaster Bujold’s Vorkosigan Saga. Three books of this series have won, and they happen to be books four, two, and nine. The out of number ordering isn’t mine, it belongs to the series. Book four, The Vor Game won in 1991, book two, Barrayar, won the next year. Clearly they were published out-of-order, so can be read out-of-order. But I don’t know enough about this series to know how out-of-order. Can I skip straight to book nine, Mirror Dance, without the books in between? No, really, can I? If you know the series and can answer that question, please do so in the comments below.

Herbert. As in Frank Herbert. 1966 saw Dune share the Hugo Award with Roger Zelazny’s …And Call Me Conrad. You’ll notice Dune is not sitting up on my already read list, something that surprises people when they learn that about me. I’ve tried reading some Herbert, specifically Destination: Void. In short? It defeated me. It’s the rare book I’ve walked away from unfinished. I had a hard time getting into his writing style, especially the schizophrenic head hopping around the characters. Which I understand is one of the hallmarks of Dune. If you’ve read both Void and Dune, could you speak up in the comments, let me know what I’m in for? Because, honestly, that’s the first big road block that I seen on my trip through the Hugos.

Retro Hugos. They’ve awarded these three times, for years that had Worldcons but no Hugos. As I start, I’m not planning to these to my reading list. What interests me about doing this read-through is the history of the genre and seeing what books were deemed important when they were written. The Retro Hugos are about which books stood the test of time. Sure, we can go back and give Fahrenheit 451 the Hugo award for 1954, and that’s an easy pick as it’s now become one of the most important books to come out of the genre. But would the voting fans in the year 1954 actually give it the award over Childhood’s End? Or any of the other books nominated? Or would the award in 1954 go to a book that organizers in 2004 didn’t think to nominate? Keep in mind in 1955 the voters went for what is frequently cited as the worst book to win the Hugo. Or, at least, frequently cited as being frequently cited as such. Speaking of which…

They’d Rather Be Right. It’s the second novel to win the Hugo, thus the second novel in my read through. It’s also probably the hardest Hugo winner to track down a copy of. Even alibris has precious few going for no less than $10, and copies of its rerelease as The Forever Machine go for a minimum of $25. Its only digital availability is through the Sony Reader store. I may be forced to skip over this one in my initial read, not because of its reputation, but because of its availability. I’ve also seen others who have done the all-Hugo read call this a “struggle.” It’s the only Hugo winner rated at below three stars on Goodreads, and one of only three below 3.5. So…maybe Dune isn’t my first big speed bump.

Re-Reads. It’ll be awhile til I hit my first re-read, and when I do it’ll be the only Hugo winner I read before I turned eighteen. So that’s a clear candidate for a re-read. I’ll probably re-read the others, too. Not like I need too much of an excuse to pick Diamond Age back up. Though…do I read the version of American Gods that won, or the slightly tweaked 10th Anniversary edition signed by the author?

I’ll probably start the read through in January, even though I’m not intending this as a finish-in-2013 goal. And I plan to read them in order, just as soon as I can track down a copy of The Demolished Man. Thank goodness for used bookstores and alibris. I’d be thrilled if anyone wanted to join me on the read, I’ll announce here on the blog and in Twitter when I plan to start each book, and will plan to talk about each when I’m done. I might make this a monthly thing, which means the read-through would take awhile. But it feels more like a book club that way. For now, I’ve shoved all of them onto a Goodreads shelf. Go, browse, and I’ll let you know when this is starting if you want to come along.

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