Archive for February 7th, 2014

The Juvenile and the Juvenile

stranger_in_a_strange_landThere’s one unavoidable name when reading the Hugo winners: Heinlein. For anyone following along at home, we’ve now made it through thirteen months and four Heinlein novels, with one coming up in December. It’s been, to be frank, a mixed bag. I know there are Heinlein devotees out there, those who devour every word he’s written and love them to pieces. With the four books we’ve read together these last few months, I’ve now read 6 Heinlein books.

I can honestly say I thoroughly enjoyed two of them. I rather liked reading Starship Troopers, though I like the movie better (sorry-not-sorry), and I loved reading Job a dozen years ago.

You’ll notice neither book from January on that list of books I loved. That’s not to say I disliked them, it’s just to say I didn’t love them.

This time around, the Hugo Awards served up one of his adult books, and the Retro Hugos served up one of his juveniles.

Stranger in a Strange Land is the most famous science fiction novel of all time. At least, that’s what my copy says on the cover. I will admit, I know no other science fiction novel name dropped in a Billy Joel song, though I do wonder what books others might think deserving of that title. The book is certainly Heinlein’s opus, and in many ways is the quintessential Heinlein book. Which is to say it delves deeply into the philosophical, allows characters to expound for chapters on end, and eventually includes a woman offering herself to a father figure.

Alright, that last one isn’t necessarily quintessential, but is something I’ve stumbled across in both this book and, more literally, in Farnham’s Freehold.

farmer-in-the-sky-robert-a-heinlein20-lgeBut the debates, those have shown up in several of his books. In Starship Troopers they took the form of future military history classes, expounding on the nature of force and citizenship. In Stranger it’s the nature of religion and humanity. I’m never sure where the characters end in a Heinlein novel, and the author takes over. Perhaps I don’t actually want to know.

There were some hard jumps in Stranger that didn’t sit well. There is, most startlingly, the sudden introduction of a Greek chorus looking down on the action from heaven. It’s necessary for the conclusion of the novel, but even in a book that has Martians, an element like that is a rather sudden change.

It’s an odd shift to jump from a novel postulating a religion based on group sex to one of Heinlein’s juveniles. Farmer in the Sky was originally published in Boys’ Life, the magazine for the Boy Scouts of America. Which is important, as it explains why one of the primary plot points revolves around whether or not the main character will achieve Eagle Scout status. It’s always hard to figure out what to say about novels that I liked but didn’t love. It’s a novel that I read, a novel that I put down, and a novel that I’m already having a difficult time putting thoughts together on.

What can I say? Not every novel is going to win over 100% of readers.

And so the Read pushes on, into a month of alternate history. Our primary read is one of the scions of the Nazis-win-WWII novels, The Man in the High Castle. The secondary read postulates a Confederate victory in the Civil War in Bring the Jubilee.

No Comments

%d bloggers like this: