The strange places inspiration comes from


I mentioned last week that Urbex intrigues me.  Over in the Ukraine there exists the hole grail of Urban Exploration: Chernobyl.  It’s been getting a lot of press recently due to the disaster at the Fukushima Plant in Japan, mostly in attempts to explain the present by exploring the past and in efforts to quantify one disaster against the other.  It is, after all, vitally important to know which is the bigger disaster.  I guess because the nuclear disaster Olympics are coming up, and this will serve as a qualifying event.

So I started doing what I often do, poking around Wikipedia and following links in articles that intrigue me.  And when it comes to starting with the Chernobyl article, there’s plenty to find.  There’s the city of Pripyat, evacuated just weeks before a new amusement park was set to open.  Abandoned so quickly there are still lesson plans written on the chalkboards in classrooms, and textbooks strewn everywhere in school hallways.  There’s the sarcophagus, a structure that is heading towards failure, tasked to keep the still quite dangerous nuclear rods in place.  There’s just the fact that this area will be uninhabitable by humanity for centuries to come, even under the best of circumstances.

And that’s somewhat amazing.  It’s in part what led to my Fortnightcap Take Me Back a few weeks ago.  The idea that a piece of land could be almost erased, though in a far less literal sense.

And then, in all of that, emerged a story.  And it’s a Steampunk story.  So that’ll be added to my queue, along with stories planned for submission to the next two Innsmouth Free Press anthologies.  I love all three concepts, going to have to figure out a good way to determine which one gets to be told first.

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  1. avatar

    #1 by GFI on March 8, 2016 - 4:48 pm

    En este caso de plan de empresa se supone que la inversión inicial es de 30.000 euros y financiada totalmente por los socios promotores.

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